Last edited by Faeran
Thursday, July 9, 2020 | History

6 edition of Judaism in Persia"s Shadow found in the catalog.

Judaism in Persia"s Shadow

A Social and Historical Approach

by Jon L. Berquist

  • 193 Want to read
  • 28 Currently reading

Published by Wipf & Stock Publishers .
Written in

    Subjects:
  • Judaism - History,
  • Religion - Judaism,
  • Religion

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages288
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8866706M
    ISBN 101592443087
    ISBN 109781592443086

    Persia fell to Alexander the Great. (J-5) The Return of the Jews under Ezra and Nehemiah. Not much is known of the state of Jewish affairs between the completion of the temple in B.C. and the appearance in Jerusalem of Ezra and Nehemiah and the colonies that came with them. Nehemiah’s appearance at Jerusalem can be firmly dated at B.C. The date of Ezra’s mission is disputed. Esther is described in all versions of the Book of Esther as the Jewish queen of a Persian king Ahasuerus. In the narrative, Ahasuerus seeks a new wife after his queen, Vashti, refuses to obey him, and Esther is chosen for her king's chief adviser, Haman, is offended by Esther's cousin and guardian, Mordecai, and gets permission from the king to have all the Jews in the kingdom : Hadassah, Achaemenid Empire.

    Persia is an empire located in southern was created by Cyrus the Great in the 6th century BC and was destroyed by Alexander the Great in the 4th century BC. It became a theocratic Islamic republic in the Middle East in western Asia. The Persian Empire is the name used to refer to many historical dynasties that have ruled the country of Persia now known as Iran.   Answer: The book of Ezra begins with King Cyrus of Persia offering Jews the freedom to return to Jerusalem. Ezra –6 records, “Then the family heads of Judah and Benjamin, and the priests and Levites—everyone whose heart God had moved—prepared .

      The story of Esther happened after Cyrus, the first Persian King, called for all deported Jews to return to Jerusalem to build the House of God ( B.C., Ezra ). Most of the Jews preferred the comfortable life of the Persian Empire to an arduous life rebuilding their devastated homeland. The Persian Empire (Enlarge) (PDF for Print) (Freely Distributed) Map of the Achaemenid Persian Empire at its Greatest Extant ( BC.) This map reveals the Persian Empire in BC under its greatest ruler Darius I. The Persian Empire was founded by Cyrus in BC., after they succeeded the Babylonian Empire.


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Judaism in Persia"s Shadow by Jon L. Berquist Download PDF EPUB FB2

Judaism in Persia's Shadow: A Social and Historical Approach Paperback – Aug byCited by: Judaism in Persias Shadow book. Read 2 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. This lively account of the influence of Persian history o /5.

Judaism in Persia's Shadow: A Social and Historical Approach by Berquist, Jon L. and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at Judaism in Persia's Shadow: A Social and Historical Approach. Jon L. Berquist. Book Details. Categories: Sociological and Anthropological Studies Ancient Near Eastern Theology Judaism.

Book Information "This lively account of the influence of Persian history on the Hebrew Scriptures, and the people whose faith they express, places the emphasis. Judaism in Persia's Shadow by Jon L. Berquist,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide/5(15). Jon L. Berquist is the author of Judaism in Persias Shadow ( avg rating, 15 ratings, 2 reviews, published ), Controlling Corporeality ( avg r /5.

Ancient History Encyclopedia receives a small commission for each book sold through our affiliate partners. Recommended By Numerous educational institutions recommend us, including Oxford University, Michigan State University, and University of Minnesota.

So it was with a sense of deja vu and some smugness that I picked up Jon Berquist’s book, Judaism in Persia’s Shadow [Fortress Press].

Though some never admit it, and some no doubt never feel it, in many Parsi hearts lurks a silent competitiveness with the Jewish faith. ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: vi, pages ; 23 cm: Contents: Perspectives on the postexilic period --Setting the stage: exile and diaspora --Conquering Babylonia and the West: Cyrus ( B.C.E.) --Stability and stagnation: Cambyses ( B.C.E.) --Enforcing imperial rule: Darius ( B.C.E.)--The emergence of pluralism: Xerxes ( B.

Governors and the law: political and social maintenance --The priesthood's capture of religion: religious maintenance --Sages and wisdom: intellectual maintenance and social symbolism --Apocalyptic visions: rhetoric of violent opposition --Songs of joy and pain: popular images of a different world --Wisdom as dissent: undermining society's assumptions --Stories of the larger world: imagining other lives --The.

An intersting book. However, it has some minor flaws. Not enough effort was made to look at the issue from a Persian perspective as well.

Thus it has a Western bias. E.g. Alexander is referred to as the 'Great' yet Cyrus is deprived of that title. From an Eastern perspective Cyrus created a civilized and fair empire while Alexander killed and destroyed/5. Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Judaism in Persia's Shadow: A Social and Historical Approach by Jon L.

Berquist (, Paperback) at the best online prices at eBay. Free shipping for many products. Review of Jon L. Berquist, Judaism in Persia's Shadow: A Social and Historical Approach Daniel L.

Smith-Christopher Loyola Marymount University, [email protected] This Book Review is brought to you for free and open access by the Theological Studies at Digital Commons @ Loyola Marymount University and Loyola Law : Daniel L.

Smith-Christopher. The Medes and Persians had roamed slowly over several hundred years from the steppes to the Iranian plateau but they had been preceded years before by earlier bands of Aryans who had found an opportunity to advance into the near east when the Sumerian Empire staggered just before Hammurabi, the Amorite, steadied the central power in Mesopotamia about BC.

When this power then. The Origins of the “Second” Temple: Persian Imperial Policy and the Rebuilding of Jerusalem. London: Equinox, Finkelstein, Israel, and Neil Asher Silberman. The Bible U nearthed: Archaeology’s New Vision of Ancient Israel and the Origin of Its Sacred Texts.

New York: Free Press, Alternatively. Recommended Citation. Smith-Christopher, Daniel. Review of Judaism in Persia's Shadow: A Social and Historical Approach by Jon L.

Berquist. Journal of Religion 77 no. 4 (October ): Author: Daniel L. Smith-Christopher. In the book of Ezra, the Persian kings are credited with permitting and enabling the Jews to return to Jerusalem and rebuild their Temple; its reconstruction was effected "according to the decree of Cyrus, and Darius, and Artaxerxes king of Persia" (Ezra ).

This great event in Jewish history took place in the late sixth-century BCE, by which time there was a well-established and influential Jewish Australia: ~   Today we continue our series, Esther Actually, with a look at the cultural, historical, and religious context that produced the Book of Esther.

Much could be said about this topic of course, but based on some of my favorite commentaries, I’ve identified three influences that, for the purposes of our discussions here, should be introduced--Purim, Persia, and Patriarchy.

Jon Berquist, Judaism in Persia’s Shadow, abridged and translated from English into Persian by Nahid Pirnazar (Oberman), in Padyavand vol. 3, edited by Amnon Netzer, Costa Mesa: Mazda Publishers, Courses Undergraduate.

Introduction to Judeo-Persian: Literature and Culture (Iranian ). The implication here therefore is that Judaism and Mazdayasnaism were considered the same religion by the Persian prince and by the Jewish author.

The closeness of the relationship between Israel and Persia is indicated by the Semitic words in the later, Pahlavic parts of the Avesta. The religious texts of the Zoroastrian faith of ancient Persia are referred to as the “Avesta.” The oldest part is the Gathas, which includes a collection of hymns and one of the oldest examples of religious poetry attributed to the prophet Zoroaster (ca.

– BCE).Displayed is a page from the Gathas, in the Middle Persian language Pahlavi, and its translation into modern Persian.The beginnings of Jewish history in Iran date back to late biblical times.

The biblical books of Isaiah, Daniel, Ezra, Nehemiah, contain references to the life and experiences of Jews in the book of Ezra, the Persian kings are credited with permitting and enabling the Jews to return to Jerusalem and rebuild their Temple; its reconstruction was carried out "according to the decree of.The Persian monarch mentioned in the Book of Esther is Xerxes (), known from other sources as Ahasuerus (see niv marg.), a strong, effective ruler.

The events in this book occurred between those recorded in Ezra 6 and Ezra 7 (see the chart "Chronology of the Postexilic Period," near Ezra ).